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1 Enoch (Ethiopic; overall) (Researcher: Philip Alexander):
Note: The profile for this book is under construction.
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1.1 The text refers to itself as verbal entity (with implied or explicit boundaries): Draft entry: The text refers to itself as verbal entity (with implied or explicit boundaries). One of the key phenomena across the whole of 1Enoch is the plurality of apparent self-references of text parts to themselves, without reference to other text parts, and thus projecting themselves as part-texts within a compilation of part-texts (i.e. a section 10 text). However, in many cases these either "double up", and introduce at least slight differences to, a similar self-reference (or heading) in the immediate co-text, or they provide introductions only for quite a small piece of text. Thus while the heading itself is worded as if a it could fit a larger text or a whole text, another heading, in different terms, makes its appearance in the continuity of the flow of the sentences. See 9.12. This reverses the situation in most other texts of ancient Judaism, namely a comparative paucity and terseness, or comprehensive absence (in rabbinic literature), of self-references. (AS)

Full profile (Bibliography at the bottom):
1.1 The text refers to itself as verbal entity (with implied or explicit boundaries): Draft entry: The text refers to itself as verbal entity (with implied or explicit boundaries). One of the key phenomena across the whole of 1Enoch is the plurality of apparent self-references of text parts to themselves, without reference to other text parts, and thus projecting themselves as part-texts within a compilation of part-texts (i.e. a section 10 text). However, in many cases these either "double up", and introduce at least slight differences to, a similar self-reference (or heading) in the immediate co-text, or they provide introductions only for quite a small piece of text. Thus while the heading itself is worded as if a it could fit a larger text or a whole text, another heading, in different terms, makes its appearance in the continuity of the flow of the sentences. See 9.12. This reverses the situation in most other texts of ancient Judaism, namely a comparative paucity and terseness, or comprehensive absence (in rabbinic literature), of self-references. (AS)

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Bibliography:

Online Greek, Latin and Aramaic text: Ken M. Penner and Ian W. Scott (eds.), "1 Enoch." Pre-publication Edition, The Online Critical Pseudepigrapha. Edited by Ken M. Penner, David M. Miller, and Ian W. Scott (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2006. Online: http://www.purl.org/net/ocp/1Enoch.html), accessed 06/11/2010.

Translations:

M. A. Knibb, The Ethiopic Book of Enoch. A New Edition in the Light of the Aramaic Dead Sea Fragments, 2 vol.s (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1979); M. T. Brand, "1 Enoch", in L. H. Feldman, J. L. Kugel and L. H. Schiffman (eds.), Outside the Bible. Ancient Jewish Writings Related to Scripture, 3 vols. (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society/University of Nebraska Press, 2013), pp. 1359–1452, based on the translation of M. Knibb.

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